Gay Pride Canal Parade 2014

Gay Pride Canal Parade 2014: in Amsterdam we have the Canal Parade as a unique event that can hardly be copied because only Venice would have canals like Amsterdam has them. It was, again, a very joyful event; it is so nice to be hundreds of thousands citizens celebrating together that we are a free country where we can love whoever we want. And the creative way it is expressed makes the party even better, see for example:
gay pride canal parade 2014  gay pride canal parade 2014  gay pride canal parade 2014gay pride canal parade 2014
And the Mensa boat ‘gayniaal’, alas not recognisable as such but beautiful colours:
gay pride canal parade 2014
A specific problem for the boats is that there are lots of low bridges to pass. Those who want to make ‘volume’ have to think of a way to bring it all down to pass the bridge and come up again after it. See how this works:
gay pride canal parade 2014  gay pride canal parade 2014
Also for the Army Boat, notice how all uniforms bow for the bridge – and notice also the American militaries on the boat who brought their own flag, a political statement!
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Another political statement that I like: gay pride canal parade 2014
And finally a great message:
gay pride canal parade 2014
See you next year for the next Canal Parade!

social safety at work for gays and lesbians

  A new scientific report was published yesterday about social safety in the workplace for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people in the Netherlands under the title ‘Gewoon aan de slag’, see also: http://www.scp.nl/Publicaties/Alle_publicaties/Publicaties_2011/Gewoon_aan_de_slag
The report written by professor Saskia Keuzenkamp and Ans Oudejans sketches a work environment where 14% of gay and 5% of lesbian colleagues are confronted with unfavourable reactions to their sexual identity. This might be a lot less than in many other countries, it is way too much for the Netherlands where homosexuality is equal on all legal levels to heterosexuality. Unfavourable reactions are things like nasty jokes, openly disapproval and bothersome curious questions.
Gays and lesbians who are not open at work about their sexual identity give roughly two major explanations for that: half of them consider it as private information, the other half are afraid of possible disagreeable, inconvenient reactions.
What is very good about this report is that we finally have scientific facts about social safety at work for this specific group. A lot can be assumed, it is better to know: that allows targeted measures and I really hope that companies will actively work on that! Social safety, a strong basis for talent management, will not just come by itself, it needs an effort.

What is food for thought is what I said before in a blog: that in our policies in the Netherlands we seem to pay attention to a different ‘group’ every four years. One period it’s women, then it is migrants, then it is age, now it is gays: apparently we are unable to find the right way to inclusiveness and diversity, calling it ‘too complicated’ to include all differences and sticking to group identities rather than individual identities.
The effect is that ‘groups’ interact negatively in the workplace to get the attention that they all want, and that the outcome of measures rarely is inclusiveness for all but attention, financial means and appreciation for one group versus jealousy and frustration with others. Nobody is only gay, only woman, only migrant, only young or old or whatever; the focus on group identity in workplace measures creates stereotypes rather than inclusiveness.

 

Company Pride in Amsterdam

 On an Amsterdam conference in July the Company Pride Platform presented the Declaration of Amsterdam ‘Call to Action’ (see also: http://www.companyprideplatform.org/home/declaration-of-amsterdam). The Company Pride Platform wants a free and safe workplace for employees who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender – ‘pink’ I’d say but most professionals say LGBT employees so I will do that too. Four focus points are essential in Company Pride:
– inclusive corporate cultures
– working environment beyond legal minimum requirements
– active leadership from ‘straight’ allies and LGBT role models
– collaboration between ‘straight’ and LGBT for mutually beneficial improvements
The Company Pride Platform’s conference in July was a mixture of raising awareness, story telling and a call for active leadership. It was meaningful and moving to be there. The urgency for active leadership in Company Pride is clear on all levels of the organisation. Especially safety is an issue to be taken into account: socially, physically and mentally.
A note on the side of this all is that quite some questions arose to which answers already exist. Diversity is not that recent an issue; some aspects may be particular for LGBT, but most aspects are common regardless of the subject being gender, age, handicap, etnicity, religion or LGBT.  LBGT is relatively ‘new’ in this area, it certainly is a taboo in many places and not free in quite some countries. That however is an extra argument not to approach LGBT in a too isolated way, don’t loose energy by reinventing the wheel again and prevent that subgroups have to fight against each other to get leadership attention.
My experience is that every subgroup is afraid that it’s particular interests will disappear when cooperating with others; in this light, the focus point of inclusive corporate culture is the only road along which the diverse employees of the 21st century can and will ‘feel valued, can be their authentic selves and realize their full potential’ as the Declaration of Amsterdam says.